#PrivacyCamp21: Final Schedule

The final programme is here! Take a look at how 26 January will look like at Privacy Camp and get to know who the speakers are.

Digital rights for change: Reclaiming infrastructures, repairing the future.

With almost a decade’s legacy, this year Privacy Camp zooms in on the relations between digitalisation, digital rights and infrastructures. Sessions range in format from panels (speakers addressing the audience) to a more interactive workshop (speakers address + audience engagement experiences).

Note that all times are in CET.

Time

Room 1
(Plenary and panels)

Room 2
(Panels)

Room 3 (Workshops)

10:00-
11:00
Opening session &

STORIES of digital rights activism

   
11:05-
12:00
A new model for consent? Rethinking consent among complex infrastructures and complex explanations Local perspectives: E-life and e-services during the pandemic The #ReclaimYourFace campaign: Ban biometric mass surveillance
12:05-
13:00
Wiring digital justice: Embedding rights in Internet governance ‘by infrastructure’ On Art and Digital Rights Activism Cryptowars: The battle for encryption
13:00-
14:00
Lunch break

EDPS Civil Society Summit

Lunch break
14:05-
15:00
The privatised panopticon: Workers’ surveillance in the digital age Reclaim your face, reclaim your space: Resisting the criminalisations of public spaces under biometric mass surveillance Teach me how to hurdle: Empowering data subjects beyond the template
15:05-
16:00
Algorithmic Impact Assessments Platform Resistance and Data Rights Can restorative justice help us govern online spaces?
16:00-
16:10
Closing session


Registrations are free, but limited. Secure your spot now, the deadline to register is 24 January.

https://privacycamp.eu/?p=2232


#PrivacyCamp21: Draft schedule

As promised to many of you, the draft #PrivacyCamp21 schedule is out today. Read below what you can expect from the first online edition of Privacy Camp, taking place this year on 26 January 2021 from 10.00 to 16.05.

Digital rights for change: Reclaiming infrastructures, repairing the future.

With almost a decade’s legacy, this year Privacy Camp zooms in on the relations between digitalisation, digital rights and infrastructures. In response to our call for panels, we have received proposal tackling the subject from a variety of perspectives.

We are proud to present the selection of sessions that combine panel format (speakers addressing the audience) with a more interactive workshop format (speakers address + audience engagement experiences):

 

Time

 

 

Room 1
(Plenary and panels)

 

 

Room 2
(Panels)

 

 

Room 3 (Workshops)

 

10:00-11:00 
Opening and
STORIES of digital rights activism

 

 

 

11:05-12:00

 

A new model for consent? Rethinking consent among complex infrastructures and complex explanations

Local perspectives: E-life and e-services during the pandemic

The #ReclaimYourFace campaign: Ban biometric mass surveillance
12:05-13:00
Wiring digital justice: Embedding rights in Internet governance ‘by infrastructure’

Platform Resistance   and Data Rights

Cryptowars: The battle for encryption
13:00-14:00
 
Lunch break

 

EDPS Civil Society Summit

 
Lunch break

 

14:05-15:00
Can restorative justice help us govern online spaces?
 
 
 

Criminalising public spaces under biometric mass surveillance

Teach me how to hurdle: Empowering data subjects beyond the template

15:05-16:00

Algorithmic Impact Assessments

The privatised panopticon: Workers’ surveillance in the digital age

16:00-16:10
 Closing

Continue reading

#PrivacyCamp21: Registrations

Registrations for #PrivacyCamp21 are now open. Sign up here by 24 January to ensure your spot.

#PrivacyCamp21 is live on 26 January 2021, from 10.00 – 16.00 !

Make sure to read the final schedule and familiarise yourself with the different sessions.

The event will use Big Blue Button and attendance instructions will be sent in advance to registered participants.

See you soon!

#PrivacyCamp21: Digital rights for change | Call for Panels

Digital rights for change: Reclaiming infrastructures, repairing the future.

The 9th edition of Privacy Camp (26 January 2021) explores the relations between digitalisation, digital rights and infrastructures.

2020 has highlighted the importance of digital infrastructures. Many facets of our personal and social life rely on these infrastructures – from public health to education, from labour to services, from politics to intimate relations. Although this is not completely new, society has realised that there is a need to design and maintain digital infrastructures to prioritise the public interest – resituating the interests of private actors that so often dominate practice and discourse on the topic.

In this context, digital rights are more important than ever. Privacy and data protection are important tools to question, limit and counter massive data collection and intrusive surveillance technologies. Their impact goes well beyond individual interests. While some promote a ‘data altruism’ that would consist in inviting data subjects to consent to more and more data processing operations, it might be that the real altruism and caring for the other is actually calling for a better use of digital rights. It certainly demands thinking about how these individual rights can serve the interests of the public.

Ever-expanding desires for digitalisation – now also connected to promises of post-Covid-19 recovery – are shaped jointly by government data collection priorities and the objectives of ‘big tech’ companies. Reclaiming infrastructures, and embracing digital rights as a tool for change and justice are, in this light, critical for repairing a dire, and inevitably shared, future.

Public spaces and the environment are privileged territories for investigating the intersections between digitalisation, digital rights and infrastructures. The public space, offline and online, is as such a basic democratic infrastructure. The roll-out of surveillance measures such as automated speech moderation on social media or facial recognition technologies in our streets question whether European local authorities, police forces and private companies mandate the public space under a public interest agenda. The environmental impact is furthermore a crucial dimension of all things digital. The IT sector, broadly defined, accounts for more than 2% of global emissions, which is in the same range as aviation. The negative impact of digitalisation is reflected in the effects of big data collection and storage on energy consumption; in poor repairability of devices linked to unnecessary emissions and e-waste; or in vast carbon emissions resulted from training Artificial Intelligence models.

Moving the conversation towards a solution-oriented vision, questions remain around how digital rights can best contribute to reclaiming infrastructures, and how reclaimed infrastructures sustain democratic practices, for a fair, people-centered, digital future in the EU.

In this vein, we invite panel proposals revolving round the following themes:

1. The transformative power of digital rights
2. The social dimensions of digital infrastructures
3. The preservation of public voice in the public space
4. The environmental impact of digitalisation

Concrete examples of topics include (non-exhaustively):

  • Examples of using existing rights under EU law to advance a fair society
  • Actions and negotiations to reclaim digital infrastructures for the public interest
  • Biometric mass surveillance and resistance methods for the public square
  • Digital infrastructures of oppression | Digital infrastructures of resistance
  • Reclaim the means of deliberation and public debate

Submission guidelines:

  • Indicate a clear objective for your session, i.e. what would be a good outcome for you?
  • Include a list of maximum 4 speakers that could participate in your panel. Ensure you cover academia, civil society and decision – makers’ perspectives. Let us know which speaker(s) has/have already confirmed participation, at least in principle.
  • Make it as interactive as possible and encourage audience participation.
  • Support diversity of voices among panelists and strive for multiple perspectives.
  • Note that the average panel length is 50 minutes.
  • Send your proposal (a panel description of max. 400 words and a tentative list of speakers) to privacycamp(at)edri.org by 6 December 2020.

Deadline for panel proposal submissions: 6 December 2020

After the deadline, we will review your submissions and will notify you about the outcome of the selection procedure before 10 December. Please note that we might suggest merging panel proposals if they are similar or complement each other.

#PrivacyCamp21 Call for Panels (.PDF)

About Privacy Camp

Privacy Camp is jointly organised by European Digital Rights (EDRi), Research Group on Law, Science, Technology & Society (LSTS) at Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), the Institute for European Studies at Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles (IEE at USL-B), and Privacy Salon.

In 2021, Privacy Camp’s Content Committee are: Andreea Belu (EDRi), Gloria González Fuster (LSTS, VUB) and Rocco Bellanova (IEE, USL-B)

Privacy Camp 2021 will take place on 26 January 2021 online.
Participation is free and registrations will open in early December 2020.

For inquiries, please contact Andreea Belu at andreea.belu(at)edri(dot)org.

#PrivacyCamp20: Final programme

We are happy to present the final programme of #PrivacyCamp20. This 8th edition of Privacy Camp revolves around the topic of Technology and Activism. Besides panel discussions and workshops, this year, Privacy Camp also brings you a Critical Maker Faire. Click through the grid below to find out the details about each session as well as our famous after-party.

The print version (pdf) of the programme is available here.

Location: La Vallée, Rue Adolphe Lavallée 39, 1080 Brussels

 

Room ALICE

Room BOB

09:00-9:30
Coffee & Hi!
Coffee and Hi!

9:30-10:30

Welcome and storytelling session:
Stories of Activism

10:30-12:00 Defending digital civic space: how to counter digital threats against civil society Investigative journalism in South East Europe

12:00-13:00

Lunch break
Lunch break
13:00-14:30 How To Parltrack Workshop The impact of surveillance on today’s kids – tomorrow’s human rights activists
13:30-15:45

EDPS civil society summit (ROOM EVE)

14:30-14:45

Coffee break
Coffee break
14:45-16:00 Access requests as a
tool for activism
“Actually, In Google We Trust”? A ‘Deconstructing’ Conversation on Russian Internet

16:00-16:30

Coffee break
Coffee break
16:30-17:45

Activism and digital infrastructures

Internet for All – Silenced and Harassed No More!
17:45-17:50 Closing

18:00-20:00

Foodtruck & Chats

20:00-24:00

after party after

party after party


Register now in order to secure your attendance for #PrivacyCamp20. This is a free-to-attend event but registration is required as space is limited. We have extended the registration deadline until Friday, 17 January 2020.

Please note that this year we are moving into a new venue: LaVallee, Brussels. See you there at 9AM on 21 January 2020.

#PrivacyCamp20: After-Party

Technology and Activism and chats and drinks and a cool DJ line-up. You can have all of them by joining us at the Privacy Camp After – party from 20h onward.

Note that from 18h – 20h we will have a food truck feeding us and pre-party chats.

The party location is the same one in which we’ll be all day, but with a rather different atmosphere. Four talented DJs will take us through their selected work. Expect to hear great sets, mixes and live coding!

DJ LINE-UP

  • 20h – 21h fukamiSoul and jazz, bit of groove and beats
  • 21h – 22h ki:ki Some intergalactic electro with hints of upload filter tech3hand a dash of new wave
  • 22h – 23h Indidjinouspost-apocalyptic, sci-fi inspired techstep jungle/drum & bass. Expect the unexpected.
  • 23h – 24h Dago Sondervan – live coding, algorave

24h – … Still partying? Cool! Then we did a good job. While we’d love to continue the partying until next year, this is when we start turning the lights on, put on some goodbye music and give each other hugs that last us until the next edition of Privacy Camp. See you soon!

Entrance to the party will be possible only with a #PrivacyCamp20 conference badge.

#PrivacyCamp20: Draft programme

The beta version of the #PrivacyCamp20 programme is here. Please note this schedule is subject to changes. The final programme (online and in print version) will be available in January 2020 and offer full descriptions of the panels listed below. See you on the 21 January 2020!

 

 

Track 1

Track 2

09:00-9:30
Coffee & Hi!
Coffee and Hi!

9:30-10:30

Welcome and storytelling session:
Stories of Activism

 

10:30-12:00 Defending digital civic space: how to counter digital threats against civil society Investigative journalism in South East Europe

12:00-13:00

Lunch break
Lunch break
13:00-14:30 HowTo Parltrack Workshop

The impact of surveillance on today’s kids – tomorrow’s human rights activists

13:30-15:45

EDPS civil society summit

14:30-14:45

Coffee break
Coffee break
14:45-16:00 Access requests as a
tool for activism
“Actually, In Google We Trust”? A ‘Deconstructing’ Conversation on Russian Internet

16:00-16:30

Coffee break
Coffee break
16:30-17:45

Activism and digital infrastructures

 

Internet for All – Silenced and Harassed No More!
17:45-17:50 Closing

Continue reading

#PrivacyCamp20: Call for submissions

Privacy Camp 2020: Technology and Activism

For the 8th edition, Privacy Camp takes “Technology and Activism” as its focus. Over the last decade, digital technologies have played a significant role in activism by mobilising social protests, fostering new forms of civil disobedience, or simply by facilitating the coordination of activist work in the analogue world. Some scholars assigned particular value to the networked nature of cyberspace, arguing that this structure enables people to communicate and take action outside of traditional hierarchical power structures. However, networked information systems also enhance the surveillance power of repressive regimes.

Going beyond cyber-optimist and cyber-pessimist arguments, Privacy Camp 2020 will seek to explore further dynamics in the activist-technology entanglements. Together with activists from diverse fields and scholars working at the intersection of technology and activism, Privacy Camp 2020 will cover a broad range of practices and issues including surveillance, censorship, civic participation in information policy making, social media and political dissent, online civil disobedience, data justice, data activism, commons and peer production, citizen science and more.


Participate!

For this edition, we call for (1) panel proposals and (2) critical making and DIY projects (see further below).

1. Call for Panels

We welcome panel proposals relating to the broad theme of “technology and activism”. We also welcome alternative types of sessions such as workshops or formats with more interaction between the participants than a traditional panel.

We are particularly interested in proposals on the following topics:
• social media and political dissent
• hacktivism and civil disobedience
• critical public sphere and hashtag publics (e.g. #MeToo, #BlackLivesMatter etc)
• data justice and data activism
• commons, peer production, and platform cooperativism
• citizen science

Submission guidelines:

• Indicate a clear objective for your session, i.e. what would be a good outcome for you?
• Include a list of speakers that could participate in your panel (and let us know which speaker has already confirmed, at least in principle, to participate).
• Make it as interactive as possible, think about how to include the audience and diverse actors. Note that the average panel length is 75 minutes.
• Send your proposal (a panel description of max 400 words and a tentative list of speakers) to privacycamp(at)edri.org by 10 November.

Deadline for panel proposal submissions: 10 November 2019 (hard deadline, no extension)

After the deadline, we will review your submissions and will notify you about the selection process before 20 November. Please note that we might suggest merging panel proposals if they are very similar.

2. Call for Makers: Critical Maker Faire at Privacy Camp 2020

We are pleased to invite makers, disruptors, tinkerers, crafters and DIY artists with the aim of bringing even more diverse communities into the conversation on technology and activism. Maker cultures attempt to democratise technology by focusing on production and consumption patterns and citizen engagement in technology design. We seek makers who create with the ethos of counterculture and activism – in distinction from those who align with innovation and entrepreneurship.

We will provide an exhibit space for makers working at the intersection of technology and activism. Makers will be able to engage participants and hold experiments. Possible maker projects may include, but are not limited to: DIY hardware, biohacking tools, wearables, bots, DIY air quality sensors, experiments with glitch and stitch.

If you are interested to submit your work for the Critical Maker Faire, please contact us at privacycamp(at)edri.org before 30 November 2019.

About Privacy Camp

Privacy Camp is jointly organised by European Digital Rights (EDRi), Research Group on Law, Science, Technology & Society at Vrije Universiteit Brussel (LSTS-VUB), the Institute for European Studies at Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles (USL-B), and Privacy Salon.

Privacy Camp 2020 will take place on 21 January 2020 in Brussels, Belgium. Participation is free and registrations will open in early December.

For inquiries, please contact Andreea Belu at andreea.belu(at)edri(dot)org or Imge Ozcan at imge.ozcan(at)vub(dot)be.

#PrivacyCamp20: EDPS – Civil Society Summit 2020

We are pleased to announce that Privacy Camp will host once again the annual EDPS Civil Society Summit on 21 January 2020.

For a third year in a row, EDRi members and other important actors in civil society will meet the European Data Protection Supervisor for a discussion on the most ardent threats to our rights and freedoms online.

Registrations for the Summit will open in December. Please note the number of seats is limited and Civil Society Organisations are given priority.

Watch the EDPS Civil Society Summit at Privacy Camp 2019.

Watch the EDPS Civil Society Summit at Privacy Camp 2018