Join #PrivacyCamp23 online

You can watch some of the #PrivacyCamp23 sessions live. Check out the programme to see which room will stream the sessions you are interested in and click on the corresponding visual. The stream will start on 25 January, 9:00 CET.

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#PrivacyCamp23: Final programme

The final programme is here! Check out the final schedule now to find out what you can expect from the 11th edition of Privacy Camp. The event will take place on Wednesday 25 January 2023 as an offline gathering in Brussels, with the possibility of following an online stream of sessions online.

In 2023, the Privacy Camp invites you to participate in, and foster, a discussion about a world that finds itself in a constant state of crisis, and in which the digital is, itself, critical.

Find a PDF version of the programme here.

TIMEPANELS
(Room Salle des Arches)
PANELS
(Room Boudoir)
WORKSHOPS
(Room Salon)
09:00 – 09:30COFFEE & WELCOME
09:40 – 11:00Reimagining platform ecosystems (Valentina Pavel, Ada Lovelace Institute)The rise of border tech, and civil society’s attempt to resist it, through the AI Act’s eyes (Caterina Rodelli, Access Now)Policing the crisis, policing as crisis: the problem(s) with Europol (Chloé Berthélémy, EDRi)
11:00 – 11:10COFFEE BREAKCOFFEE BREAKCOFFEE BREAK
11:10 – 12.30Contesting AI & data practices. Practical approaches to preserving public values in the datafied society (Mirko Tobias Schäfer, Utrecht University)Critical as existential: The EU’s CSA Regulation and the future of the internet (Ella Jakubowska, EDRi)Digital police partout, justice nulle part / Digital police everywhere, justice nowhere (Sarah Chander, EDRi)
12:30 – 14:00LUNCH BREAKLUNCH BREAKLUNCH BREAK
14:00 – 15:20In the eye of the storm: how sex workers navigate and adapt to real – and mythical – crises (Luca Stevenson, European Sex Workers’ Rights Alliance – ESWA)Saving GDPR enforcement thanks to procedural harmonisation: Great, but how exactly? (Gloria González Fuster, VUB / LSTS)The climate crisis is a key digital rights issue (Jan Tobias Muehlberg, Université Libre de Bruxelles)
15:20 – 15:30COFFEE BREAKCOFFEE BREAKCOFFEE BREAK
15:30 – 16:50Solidarity not solutionism: digital infrastructure for the planet (Shawna Finnegan, APC & Becky Kazansky, The Engine Room)The EU can do better: How to stop mass retention of all citizen’s communication data? (Siméon de Brouwer, Assistant to Patrick Breyer MEP)In spyware we trust. New tools, new problems? (EDPS – Civil Society Summit)
17:00 – 17:30CLOSING WORDS
17:30 – 22:00BAR & NETWORKBAR & NETWORKBAR & NETWORK

For any questions or concerns, do not hesitate to reach out at privacycamp@edri.org.

#PrivacyCamp23: Draft programme schedule

In 2023, the Privacy Camp invites you to participate in, and foster, a discussion about a world that finds itself in a constant state of crisis, and in which the digital is, itself, critical.

Check out the draft schedule now to find out what you can expect from the 11th edition of Privacy Camp. The event will take place on Wednesday 25 January 2023 from 9.00 to 17.30 CET as an offline gathering in Brussels, with the possibility of following an online stream of sessions online. Whether you want to attend physically or follow the stream online, you will need to register in order to receive the practical instructions. In either case, participation is free.

In response to our call for panels we have received proposals tackling the subject from a variety of perspectives. We are proud to present the sessions that our content committee have selected:

TIMEPANELSPANELSWORKSHOPS
09:00 – 09:30COFFEE & WELCOME
09:40 – 11:00Reimagining platform ecosystems (Valentina Pavel, Ada Lovelace Institute)The rise of border tech, and civil society’s attempt to resist it, through the AI Act’s eyes (Caterina Rodelli, Access Now)The climate crisis is a key digital rights issue (Fieke Jansen, Critical Infrastructure Lab)
11:00 – 11:10COFFEE BREAK
11:10 – 12.30Contesting AI & data practices. Practical approaches to preserving public values in the datafied society (Mirko Tobias Schäfer, Utrecht University)Critical as existential: The EU’s CSA Regulation and the future of the internet (Ella Jakubowska, EDRi)Digital police partout, justice nulle part / Digital police everywhere, justice nowhere (Sarah Chander, EDRi)
12:30 – 14:00LUNCH BREAK
14:00 – 15:20Saving GDPR enforcement thanks to procedural harmonisation: Great, but how exactly? (Gloria González Fuster, VUB / LSTS)In the eye of the storm: how sex workers navigate and adapt to real – and mythical – crises (Yigit Aydinalp, European Sex Workers’ Rights Alliance – ESWA)Policing the crisis, policing as crisis: the problem(s) with Europol (Chris Jones, Statewatch)
15:20 – 15:30COFFEE BREAK
15:30 – 16:50Solidarity not solutionism: digital infrastructure for the planet (Shawna Finnegan, Association for Progressive Communications – APC)The EU can do better: How to stop mass retention of all citizen’s communication data? (Friedemann Ebelt, Patrick Breyer MEP)Spyware – Statehacking (EDPS – Civil Society Summit)
17:00 – 17:30CLOSING WORDS
17:30 – 22:00BAR & NETWORK

Registrations for #PrivacyCamp23 are now open! Sign up here by 18 January 2023 to secure your spot to EDRi’s flagship event, bringing together activists, academia and decision-makers around the topic of digital rights.

For any questions or concerns, do not hesitate to reach out at privacycamp@edri.org.

#PrivacyCamp23: registrations now open

Registrations for #PrivacyCamp23 are now open! Sign up here by 18 January 2023 to secure your spot to EDRi’s flagship event, bringing together activists, academia and decision-makers around the topic of digital rights.

After two years of virtual editions, Privacy Camp 2023 will take place on Wednesday, 25 January as an offline gathering in Brussels, with the possibility of following an online stream of sessions online.

Whether you want to attend physically or follow the stream online, you will need to register in order to receive the practical instructions. In either case, participation is free. This event is wheelchair accessible and will provide priority seating.


As we put 10 years of Privacy Camp behind, and with the 11th edition approaching, it is clearer than ever that our main mission continues to guarantee the safeguard of human rights in today’s vigorously changing world.

In 2023, the Privacy Camp invites you to participate in, and foster, a discussion about the a world that finds itself in a constant state of crisis, and in which the digital is, itself, critical.

How do digital technologies feed into and foster the multiple crises we inhabit? What do we need to consider when approaching the digital as a critical resource that we should nurture, so to promote and protect rights and freedoms? What does it mean to regulate digital technologies and infrastructures in times of crises?


Join us in answering critical questions during the 11th edition of Privacy Camp. We rely on you.

A draft programme is already available on our website for you to already start planning the different sessions you’d like to attend.

#PrivacyCamp23: Critical. Digital. Crisis. | Call for Panels (Deadline extended)

The 11th edition of Privacy Camp invites to explore the criticality of our digital worlds. 

Invoking critical times often sounds like a rhetorical trick. And yet, this year, we have witnessed the beginning of both an energy and security crisis, caused by the Russian invasion of Ukraine. In the meantime, the world is still dealing with a major health crisis, while increasingly acknowledging the urgency of the climate crisis. In fact, crises are situations where the relations in which we are entangled change, so that understanding and making an impact on how these relations change, and in favor of whom, becomes crucial.

Hence, these are some of the questions we want to ask. How do digital technologies feed into and foster the multiple crises we inhabit? What do we need to consider when approaching the digital as a critical resource that we should nurture, so to promote and protect rights and freedoms?

Our call for panels aims at fostering a conversation in which the criticality of digital technologies can be read in two ways (following the Oxford English Dictionary). On the one hand, the  critical as a situation having the potential to become disastrous. On the other hand, the critical as having a decisive or crucial importance in the success, failure, or existence of something. For instance, the critical nature of digital infrastructures rests on the importance of these infrastructures in all aspects of our lives: from public health to education, labour and services, from politics to intimate relations. At the same time, digital infrastructures and technologies become critically important in times of crises. 

While not all critical infrastructure is digital, much of the digital infrastructure is becoming critical.  For example, digital technologies can contribute to reinforcing geo-political tensions, because of extractivist approaches to rare raw materials mining and the reliance on external powers for critical infrastructure.

Our ability to deal with multiple crises as societies is also quite dependent on the way the digital public sphere functions and how EU regulation is enforced, including the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the Digital Services Act. Ongoing debates about what kind of security European societies and institutions want to pursue contribute to shifting European and national authorities’ stance on what kinds of technologies law enforcement and migration control should rely on, and how these technologies should be governed. This is becoming particularly tangible in the approach to the regulation of border control technologies in the AI Act, increased powers and broader scope of the recent Europol’s mandate, as well as to the regulation of Child Sexual Abuse Material (CSAM) in the CSA Regulation.

If we are concerned with the future of rights, democracies and the planet, we are to remain critical of how both rights and digital infrastructures are organised and controlled, what role should the private sector have, or how all things digital impact our environment in terms of energy and ecology. This requires a broader conversation involving perspectives and approaches focusing on various rights, be they individual and collective, traditional or new.

In 2023, the Privacy Camp invites you to participate in, and foster, a discussion about the critical state(s) of our a world in which the digital is, itself, critical. What does it mean to regulate digital technologies and infrastructures in times of crises? Specifically, we invite submissions that answer the following questions:

  • How do digital rights look like during times of crises?
  • What is the long-term impact of border control digital technologies implemented during times of crises?
  • How does the crisis logic boosts extractivist approaches with regard to data, natural resources and social justice?
  • What is the link between crisis politics and the rise of securitisation narratives in EU digital policy-making?
  • How do we avoid a techno-solutionist approach to solving crises?
  • How do we sustain legal standards and the rule of law principles, (Is the GDPR in the middle of an (enforcement) crisis, and how to save it?

Submission guidelines:

  • Indicate a clear objective for your session, i.e. what would be a good outcome for you?
  • Include  a list of a maximum of 4 speakers that could participate in your panel.  Ensure you cover academia, civil society and decision–makers’  perspectives. Let us know which speaker(s) has/have already confirmed  participation, at least in principle.
  • Make it as interactive as possible and encourage audience participation.
  • Support diversity of voices among panelists and strive for multiple perspectives.
  • Note that the average panel length is 50 minutes.

To submit a proposal, please fill in this form by 20 November 2022, 23:59 CEST. (Deadline extended)

We will review submissions and will notify you about the outcome of the selection procedure before 1 December 2022. Please note that we might suggest combining panel proposals if they are similar or complement each other.

About Privacy Camp

Privacy Camp is jointly organised by European Digital Rights (EDRi), the Research Group on Law, Science, Technology & Society (LSTS) at Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), the Institute for European Studies at Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles (IEE at USL-B), and Privacy Salon.

In 2023, Privacy Camp’s Content Committee are: Andreea Belu (EDRi), Gloria González Fuster (LSTS, VUB) and Rocco Bellanova (LSTS, VUB)

Privacy Camp 2023 will take place on 25 January 2023 in a hybrid format (in Brussels with online broadcast). Participation is free and registrations will open in December 2022.

For inquiries about the programme and/or to support the event organisation as a volunteer, please contact Andreea Belu at andreea.belu(at)edri(dot)org.

#PrivacyCamp22: Event Summary

The theme of the 10th-anniversary edition of Privacy Camp was “Digital at the centre, rights at the margins” and included thirteen sessions on a variety of topics. The event was attended by 300 people. If you missed the event or want a reminder of what happened in a session, find the session summaries and video recordings here.

#PrivacyCamp22: Livestream

Parallel sessions at the event will take place in 2 rooms: Alice & Bob. This year, the Privacy Camp conference will also be live-streamed. So, in case you did not register or you struggle to connect to the room, you can follow the livestream here.

The sessions will be recorded and shared following the event. So in case you miss a session, you can watch them later.

Final schedule

#PrivacyCamp22: Final Schedule

The final programme is here! Find the full schedule of sessions and speakers for the 10th anniversary edition of Privacy Camp on 25 January 2022.

View/download the complete schedule in print format here (pdf).

Digital at the centre, rights at the margins?

After 10 successful editions and serving as the flagship annual event for digital rights enthusiasts in Europe, this year Privacy Camp will reflect on a decade of digital activism, coming together to discuss the best ways to advance human rights in the digital age.

Note that all times are in CET.


Registrations are free, so register now! The deadline to register is 16:00 CET, 24 January.

https://privacycamp.eu/2021/12/07/privacycamp22-registration-now-open/


#PrivacyCamp22: Draft programme schedule

Digital at the centre, rights at the margins?

Privacy Camp turns 10 in 2022 and it’s time to celebrate!

The special anniversary edition of Privacy Camp 2022 will be the occasion to reflect on a decade of digital activism, and to think together about the best ways to advance human rights in the digital age.

Check out the draft schedule now to find out what you can expect from the 10th edition of Privacy Camp. The event will take place online on 25 January 2022 from 9.00 to 17.30 CET.

The event will use an open source and privacy friendly tool called Big Blue Button. Participants will receive instructions on how to join prior to the event.

Sessions

In response to our call for panels, we have received proposal tackling the subject from a variety of perspectives.

We are proud to present the sessions that our content committee and the committee’s advisors have selected:

  • Connecting algorithmic harm throughout the criminal legal cycle
  • Regulation vs. Governance: Who is marginalised, is “privacy” the right focus, and where do privacy tools clash with platform governance
  • Centring social injustice, de-centring tech: The case of the Dutch child benefits scandal
  • Regulating tech sector transgressions in the EU
  • A Feminist Internet
  • Drawing a (red) line in the sand: On bans, risks and the EU AI Act
  • How it started / how it is going: Status of Digital Rights half-way to the next EU elections
  • Stop Data Retention – now and forever!
  • The DSA, its future enforcement and the protection of fundamental rights
  • Surveillance tech as misclassification 2.0 for the gig economy?
  • Ministry of Microsoft: Public data in private hands

The final schedule will be published at the beginning of January.

More information

The 10th anniversary edition of Privacy Camp offers a forward-looking retrospective on the last decade of digital rights. This online edition aims at building on the lessons of the past and at collectively articulating strategic ways forward for the advancement of human rights in the digital society.

Emerging intersections within the realms of regulating digitalisation as well as within other broader social justice movements point that – while some issues remain timeless – the power struggles ahead might happen on new terrain(s). How can we adapt to these new terrains, while drawing on a decade’s worth of lessons? How can we organise with broader groups of people and other communities? What are the points of reflection we must focus on, to address the wider impact of the digital rights’ fight?

Read more about Privacy Camp.

#PrivacyCamp23: registrations are now closed

Online registrations for #PrivacyCamp23 are unfortunately closed since 23 January 2023.

If you want to follow the stream online, you will need to register in order to receive the practical instructions.

As we put 10 years of Privacy Camp behind, and with the 11th edition approaching, it is clearer than ever that our main mission continues to guarantee the safeguard of human rights in today’s vigorously changing world. In 2023, the Privacy Camp invites you to participate in, and foster, a discussion about the a world that finds itself in a constant state of crisis, and in which the digital is, itself, critical.

How do digital technologies feed into and foster the multiple crises we inhabit? What do we need to consider when approaching the digital as a critical resource that we should nurture, so to promote and protect rights and freedoms? What does it mean to regulate digital technologies and infrastructures in times of crises?

Join us in answering critical questions during the 11th edition of Privacy Camp. We rely on you.

The final programme is already available on our website for you to plan the different sessions you’d like to attend.